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that educators will continue the science experience. john. >> reporter: they locked the doors a few minutes ago here at the palace of fine arts. thousands turned out to say thank you and see you later. people came from all over the country and around the bay. the wongs from san jose are regulars. >> so i son loved this place. it's a lot of things for him to play hands on. he got to learn a lot of things. >> reporter: inside, eight-year- old james went right to his favorite. >> these are circles, where you can spin them. they just go around the table. >> reporter: the exploratorium closes here tomorrow. >> try it one more time. >> reporter: it's pioneered interactive science 43 years ago, the idea even more crucial today. >> it was actually boring in school, but when you come here, you get to do it, and it's like, oh, you know this is fun so when you grow up, you remember it. >> reporter: the exploratorium has offered hands-on science experiments to millions of young people and also trained 6400 teachers to be science teachers. >> we decided to come and explore the exploratorium while it was sti
honorary degrees, she's been the first of everything, ran the national science foundation, she was the -- >> nuclear regulatory commission. >> nuclear regulatory commission. and she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at mit. amazing. [applause] nancy-ann deparle is assistant to the president and the deputy chief of staff for the executive office of the white house. she's an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she's been called the health czar of america, the point guard overhauling the american health care system. how about that for a job? >> there you go. >> what a powerhouse right here. [applause] so we, actually, have a lot of brain power up here right now. [laughter] and i wonder, all of you could have done very different things. you really had a lot of choices. so i'd just love to hear you about how you ended up picking what you did. who wants to start? >> you have the -- >> no. >> i'm a failed violinist. of laugh -- [laughter] i was raised to be a musician, and my mother still asks me what happened. [laughter] but i was always interested in p
reproduction system. [laughter] a lecture by tied a can and a member of the house committee on science and technology is the guy than there was a theory that on me just was not a good candidate and did not connect very well and was somewhat awkward. remember when he went to michigan and said trees were the right to heighth. the actual quote was a love this state. it seems right that the trees are the right height. [laughter] away from here i find no trees in that please. no trees as such a perfect height as these. can never be at ease with trees that grow higher than one's knees or too high to splinter in the breeze. wisconsin can have their bragging rights on cheese and colorado is where you take your skis and connecticut as lyme disease. [laughter] and another visa my prepared to sneeze but here we have the perfect height of trees. [applause] according to that theory romney was not a good candidate they should have been nominated somebody else. also a theory there were demographically behind and did not understand the people they were appealing to was no longer in the majority i trie
eyes stay fixed on the clock. >>> japanese robots that look after the elderly, it sounds like science fiction, but it's increasingly science fact. and with good reason. japanese society's aging faster than any in the world. over three million people suffer from see nile dementia. nursing staff and facilities are stretched past capacity. researchers are building new and humane intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this home south of tokyo. the robot works the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they recognize the medical equipment. ironically, care giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans. but the situation may be
nation," we love a good science fiction story. and this year, the gop gave us plenty of fantasy. our next award is the ray bradbury award for lead performance in a science fiction role. it's one of my favorites. watch this. >> by the end of my second term, we will have the first permanent base on the moon. and it will be american. >> it seems to me, first of all, from what i understand from doctors, that's really rare. if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> i stood up and said the science is bogus. the dangers of carbon dioxide? tell that to a plant how dangerous carbon dioxide is. >> all the candidates are so deserving. but the revvie can only go to one person. and it goes to newt gingrich for his out-of-this-world ideas. congratulations, newt. your revvie will be waiting for you at the moon base when you get there. we'll be right back. >> the revvies will return with president obama, clint eastwood, and carl rove. plus, the award for political performer of the year. you're watching the second annual revvie awards only on msnbc. jamie
on science. what science would you use? she said, we would use the united nations, the inter governmental panel on climate change. it cooperate have been better -- it couldn't have been better timing. you talk about poetic justice, governor, it was a matter of days that clay mat gate came in. remember climate gate? it shows without a shadow of the doubt that the united nations has been cooking this science for a long period of time. >> it is amazing. when you bring these things to light a lot of americans are shocked to realize that you and the last few in the senate may be the last backstop before this administration takes us into some international treaty, international law, international agreement that none of us really would ever agree to. >> there are people i serve with who think it is not a good idea. what about our sovereignty? that's what it is all about. nonetheless, this did come from them. you have to keep in mind that -- you and i can both remember when the democrats' primary source of funding in washington was the labor unions and it was other things. now it is the far left
rate of spending were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thoughtht i would show you wht thuld happen if we change into thspeaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $1
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was the leading spokesperson for black civil rights, and a leads spokesperson for women's rights and the conservatives said america's fascistses are those that thing wall street comes first and the american people come second. so he had enemies and the enemies wantedded to get rid of him. but he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in california, gallup released a poll asking voters who they want on the ticket. 65% said they wanted wallace, 2% said they wanted harry truman the question how were the party bosses going to -- roosevelt was feeble and when they party bosses come to him and want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says i want wallace but i can't fight this by myself. i i'm not strong enough, and he finally gave in, and it was table that he did. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every one of the roosevelt kids was furious. they were huge w
carolina science institute. the fallen stars recovered from the christmas eve heist are worth over $80,000. >>> it may not have the madness of times square but folks in lisburn, pennsylvania, have their own wacky way of ringing in the new year. on new year's eve the town drops yellow britches in honor of the yellow breeches creek. creative. >>> organizers in southern california applied the finishing touches to the incredible mobile flower arrangements that will make up the 124th tournament of roses parade. marching bands and floats are ready to go. you can watch that entire parade on nbc. >>> in nebraska, folks have a unique way of getting rid of the holiday, treat the fruitcake. the fruitcake filleting. people of all ages jumps at the chance, nice arm, to chuck the unwanted christmas gifts. >>> now for entertainment news. what's the new year without a psy update? he rang in the new year at times square telling jay gray he might be ready to move on from gangnam style. >> i cannot just, you know, stay here. i got to move forward. i'm working on a new thing. but if i keep doing this and
and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokesperson, the antifeminist because he was the leader in the human rights of the party and the entire imperialists and the conservatives that said america's fascists are acting king wall street comes first and the american people second so we had enemies and they wanted to get rid of him on that ticket in 1944 but the problem was he was enormously popular. 65% they want wallace on the ticket and 2% said they wanted. truman that the question is how were they going to thwart this. roosevelt when the party busses started to come to him and they want to get the rottweilers of the tickets, roosevelt says to him i support him but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough. i'm depending on you guys to do it and he finally caved in and it was terrible that he did. his family was furious. every single one of them were furious. there were huge wallace supporters and he had the backing of labor and the black delegates at the conv
rate of spding were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking forereign language] eart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... announcer: this song was s created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio.. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i wod show youwhat thuld happen if wechange into the speaker boehner plan,
, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can happen in politics? and how can
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. yeah we both relieve coughs, sneezing, aches, fevers. and i relieve nasal congestion. overachiever. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. >>> we're following breaking news tonight. it's a medical condition of secretary of state hillary clinton. hillary clinton is in a new york city hospital where she will remain for the next few days. doctors found a blood clot during a medical exam related to her concussion a few weeks ago. they want to keep her at new york presbyterian hospital for observations. >>> 26 hours before the fiscal cliff deadline and for now, lawmakers have hit an impasse. what happens if no deal is reached? specifically, how much would you pay in taxes? there's a calculator online to help you figure that out. we have a breakdown. >> if you want to have a sense of how the fiscal cliff could askts -- ask -- affect you specifically, in terms of how much more you
behind are hundreds of orphaned elephants. our contributing science correspondent m. sanjayan of the nature conservancy found a woman who has devoted her entire life to helping them at an elephant sanctuary in kenya. >> reporter: these orphaned elephants are getting a second chance at life thanks to their foster mother, dame daphne sheldrick. >> we tried to replicate what that baby elephant would have in the wild, the most important thing being a family. >> reporter: sheldrick has lived among elephants nearly 60 years and started the orphanage in the 1970s when killing elephants for their tusks became an international crisis. over the years, she has discovered elephants share many traits with humans: a long life-span, mourning of their dead and strong family bonds. that's led to new techniques for raising elephants in captivity. >> so we have a team of keepers that represents the elephant family that they've lost. and here in the nursery, the keepers or attendants are with the little orphans 24 hours a day because a baby elephant in a natural situation would never ever be left
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
. the study was published in the journal of food science. lunchbreak is next. a lean sandwich packed with flavor. we're cooking with the co-founders of "tom and eddie's". this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. hello, i'm alex trebek. for over 10 years now, i've been representing the colonial penn life insurance company and i'm here today to talk with some of their insurance representatives about their guaranteed acceptance life insurance. that was a really good point. hi, alex. hi, everyone. i thought it'd be interesting to hear from you what your customers say are some of the things they like best about colonial penn's whole life insurance. who's gonna start? well, it's guaranteed acceptance for people over age 50. they don't have to take a physical or answer any health questions. and it
. >> andrea mitchell in washington tonight. thank you so much. nbc chief science correspondent robert bazell joins me now. bob, walk us through exactly what happened with this blood clot and how dangerous is it? >> reporter: this is a blood clot right behind the ear, right there. in a vein that's very close to the brain. you can see it on a red dot there, where there's a blockage, in a vein that drains blood from the brain. this is not common and not usually the result of a concussion. typically people get clots on the brain itself, and those can't be treated with anti coagulants, but this can be safely cleared away with drugs. the big danger is, if it weren't dissolved, it could grow and cause a stroke. according to her doctors, she has no evidence of the neurological damage that would have resulted from a stroke. >> the doctors are saying she'll recover completely. any idea how long she might be in the hospital? >> reporter: well, kate, experts who are not involved tell me if the treatment is successful, the patient often leaves the hospital within a few days. typically patients need to ta
science correspondent, robert bazell, to take a closer look at how such injuries are diagnosed and treated. >> reporter: the type of blood clot that struck mrs. clinton is potentially dangerous but it is not a typical complication of a concussion. >> patients who have a concussion very rarely have this type of injury. this would be similar to the clot that she had. >> reporter: it's more common that a concussion would cause bleeding inside the brain. but doctors say a brain scan looking for that problem would find the clot. and most patients get brain scans after concussions in routine follow-ups. mrs. clinton's clot formed in a vein that is on the surface of the brain. the vein carries blood to the heart and lungs. the big danger is that the clot could grow larger, causing blood to back up into the brain. that could cause a stroke. doctors prevent that with blood thinners which slowly dissolve the clot. once the clot was discovered, doctors say mrs. clinton would have gotten an iv drip with a strong blood thinner, replaced a few days later with a less powerful thinner in pill form. the en
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> the fiscal cliff isn't the only piece of business congress hasn't finished as the year draws to a close. the farm bill, which has a major impact on prices of all kinds of food expired three months ago, and unless they approve a new one soon, it could mean very bad news at your local supermarket. here's nbc's stephanie gosk. >> reporter: the dairy industry is calling it the milk cliff. just like tax rates, if congress doesn't approve a farm bill by january 1st, the price of milk could go up. way up. right now, an average gallon costs $3.65. it could soar to between $6 and $8. >> that would be a pretty big impact. >> we would probably still be going through it but maybe cut down on other things. >> reporter: it wouldn't be just milk prices. all dairy products would be affected. imagine if wisconsin cheddar costs more than imported french brie. what would that mean for the average grilled cheese? one part of the large and very complicated farm
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. doctors say they are confident that hillary clinton will make a full recovery after the blood clot was found between her brain and skull. secretary clinton is viewed as a needing a presidential contender in 2016 sif she chooses to run. on the day when hillary clinton was supposed to be returning to workwork she spent another day at a new york hospital being treated with blood thinners, they expect her to make a full recovery and she will not suffer a stroke or neurological damage, her doctor is not involved in her case but he has treated cases like cars and he calls them ryder. the chairman of the department of medicine at atlantic hospital... >> i think for future is as good as her past, she will recover from this and she will be treated with blood thinners, i cannot say how long because i don't know all of the circumstances but certainly a minimum of three-six months. she should recover fully and get back to work. >> and that work is growing, she has traveled to more
science correspondent robert bazell is at columbia university hospital. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. she has a blood clot just below her ear on a blood vessel that drains blood from the brain but critically, it's not in the brain itself, which makes a difference in the prognosis. it's still a dangerous situation. you can see where the red dot there is on the diagram. it's being dissolved with blood thinners and over a period of days and all indications are that she will make a complete recovery. this is a dangerous situation, but she's going to be fine. andrea? >> good news. happy new year to you as well. thank you, robert. >>> now to the weather. scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely today throughout the southeast and gulf coast. some areas may receive over an inch of rain. isolated snow showers through the ohio valley and into the virginias with one to three inches of snow. snow. and heavier amounts over higher elevations. much of the country remains quite chilly with temperatures below average and partly cloudy conditions through the western united states. that's a look
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline to the fiscal cliff draws to within hours. unless aan agreement a
them to the science center. hosting the midnight noon celebration the party features live music, arts and crafts and a ball drop. new year's activities are free with paid admission to the science center. celebration is at 10:00 a.m. the ball drop is at 12 noon. certainly doing to be chilly through the course of the afternoon. clouds in place, mostly cloudy skies today. temperature of around 43. tonight, we down to 35 at the time of new years. we will fall back to 32. as we head to parkville, checking in and looking here at harford, everything up to speed. no problems up to towson this is what 83 looks like. 83, clear from shawan, all the way downtown.
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] as the year counts down, your savings can add up with the adt new year's sale. help protect your family with the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 -- a savings of $300 plus 15% off accessories. but you must call before midnight january 2nd. more than a security system, adt can help let your family in from the cold even when you're away from home. adjust your thermostat remotely to help save energy and money. turn on the lights, even see that everyone is safe and secure. and with adt, you can rely on our fast response monitoring for 24/7 protection against burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. the adt new year's sale. it could help you save something more important than money. call now to save $300 on adt starting at $99 installed plus 15% off accessories. sale ends midnight january 2nd. ♪ ♪ >> eric: welcome back, everybody. so this is one of our last shows of 2012. it's been a fantastic year. 2013 shaping up to be especially better for "the five." i predicted it. w
prognosis for the future? dr. lee from lsu health sciences center. thank you for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> what are the potential implications for the blood clot, where it is located and how are you reading it? >> well, i mean, it is hard without seeing the patient, but truthfully -- potentially it can be very dangerous. now, it is extremely rare to have this kind of clot in the vein after a mild concussion. if you don't have something like a skull fracture that tears some of the membranes there, but this type of clot is related to other conditions. if you have blood disorders where your blood clots too readily, you can sometimes get it if you have infection, and postpartum, it is common in women in the postpartum period. and then the clot itself can cause a back up of blood and can lead to damage of the brain and sort of like a little stroke in that area. but her doctors are reporting she doesn't have any symptoms like a stroke. they seem to think they caught it early, and they are giving her medicines to stop the clotting anti-coagulation. that takes a couple days to regulate that. >
a concussion suffered in a fall several weeks ago. joining me now, nbc's chief science and health correspondence, bob bazell. and also with me "the washington post" ruth marcus. first to you, where this clot was found, a follow-up mri we were told on sunday night, and we were told it was a clot stemming from the concussion from the fall. does that mean that the clot was necessarily caused by the concussion or could it be from an underlying condition, or is there no way to really know that fact? >> it may have been caused by both of those problems. sometimes there's sort of a perfect storm of issues going on with any individual patient, with potential histories of history of blood clots in the past, as well as head trauma. this can increase the risk of getting a blood clot in that part of the brain. >> let me ask you also about how potentially dangerous this is. we know that this is near the brain, not in the brain, it is in the area between the skull and the brain. it is behind the right ear, we're told. we don't know a whole lot more. we are told today the secretary is on with he
as a result of a fall. the cheaf science and health correspondent has more on the secretary's condition. we said potentially life-threatening and in this case it's not. they are confident the thinning medications make it okay. >> she is on the phone making calls is reassuring. it's not life-threatening and it didn't become a stroke. if the blood clot was not dissolved, blood could leak back into the brain. that would cause stroke-like symptoms or a stroke itself and she would have trouble speaking and clearly that's not happening. >> when she was first lady back in 1998, she had severe pain behind her right knew. she had a blood clot there. are the two at all connected? can they be? >> there is. this is a rare side effect. usually when they get a brain bleed, it's inside the brain. this is outside in a blood vessel. this happens and it is seen by the same mri that would see the brains there. that may have been the case with her. that might have been why she had this mri. the question is, people who have a propensity to blood clotting and some women in particular, yes, they are more likely t
. joining us now with more is nbc's chief science and health correspondent, bob bozel. bob, thank you very much for being here. >> my pleasure, joy. >> can you give us an update on secretary clinton's condition? >> doing very well, responding perfectly to treatment, nbc's cameras captured a picture of bill clinton's car leaving the hospital. didn't see bill clinton in it, but it seems to indicate the family is continuing to visit regularly, which we've known all along. all the neurologists i've spoken to says the treatments for this very rare concussion, here we see what it is, it's a blockage in a vein that drains blood from the brain and takes it to the rest of the body. if that blockage isn't cleared away, it can back up and put liquid into the skull, which could cause a stroke. that's the reason it has to be dissolved. it's dissolved with blood thinners, first as an i.v. drip, then on to pills. it's not a typical course, many doctors tell me, so no indication to doubt the reports she's doing just fine. >> this was not a stroke, that's important to emphasize, but the treatment is to pre
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> we're back with more on that breaking news. secretary of state hillary clinton has been released from the hospital. this is new video of clinton's motorcade leaving the hospital just a short time ago. she had been there since sunday recovering from a blood clot in her head. doctors now say she's making good progress on all fronts and they're confident she'll make a good recovery. this is great news. and now that mrs. clinton is out of the hospital, we're waiting on an apology from the right wing. after news broke two weeks ago that clinton suffered a concussion after fainting, they went on the attack. >> you don't want to go to a meeting or a conference or an event, you have a diplomatic illness. >> why don't we apply the same standards we apply to school kids. i want to see a doc
things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ oh beautiful for spacious skies for amber waves of grain ♪ ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ above the fruited plain ♪ america america god shed his grace on thee ♪ ♪ and crown thy good >> our gaggle here was almost unanimous in naming that ad as one of the most memorable and effective ads of the 2012 campaign. that's saying something in a race where nearly a billion dollars was spent on advertising alone in the presidential race. it's tough to stand out. we're all back, what was interesting here, kevin and stephanie, is both of you picked that ad as the most effective and both of you on the democratic side, and you both picked the most effective ad on the republican side. here it is. >> he tried, you tried. it's okay to make a change. >> so, i thought that was interesting. it's almost like you're respecting the other's work. kevin, you picked the america the beautiful. what -- >> i remember when that ad came out, it was previ
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
this freakish weather and all the sciences is so overwhelming about claimant count yet you don't see on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab by the scruff of the neck during her tenure at abc and say, we've got to cover this more? >> there were several. we would have discussions about. one of them was the environment and how we covered the environment. and every time we try to do a primetime special environment we wouldn't get a rating. that led, it's one of the chapters i write about, what i do not come across well. we had leonardo dicaprio india president clinton. we got killed for it. we did a primetime environmental special, and he was chairman of earth day that you and i thought he would just make an appearance. i got killed for. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment in a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more terrorism coverage than others did before 9/11. jon miller went in and interviewed bin laden, trekked into the mountains in afghanistan and interviewed him. we get a primeti
of science, 50, 100 and 150 years from now. thank you so much for being with us from new york city this morning. guest: it's my pleasure. host: we now go to the floor of house of representatives. that's all for "washington journal" this morning. the house is in for morning hour and at noon for legislative usiness. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's rooms, washington, d.c. january 2, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable david rivera to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists smithed by the majority and minority leaders -- submitted by majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and minority whip limited to five minutes e
with the internet, at academy of motion pix arts and sciences. oscar voters have a little more time to figure out the new online balloting system. this is first year balloting is all online. votes are now due friday, january 4th. the oscar nominees will still be announced thursday, january 10th. >>> enjoy it while it lasts because apparently, gangnam style's days are numbered. umbe south korean pop star psy says he is getting tired of his own hit. >> what in he brought it to the people. >> he gave it to the people and then he got fotopoulos lahr and now he is tired of t the song is the most popular ever on youtube with more than one billion views. in an interview, psy says his performance at last year's new year's eve concert could be his last. don't your way. he is working on a new single. >> he won't be just a one-hit wonder. >> something tells me that is all we're going to see of p. sy. >> you think so. >> i mean gangnam style. >> he is going all morning line. >> he raised the bar and now there is nothing to do but fall short of the bar. good luck. >> coming up next, new laws take effect acros
with the switch to online balloting. the academy of motion pictures arts and sciences says it's extending the nomination deadline so voters have the deadline to figure out the new system. first year balloting is all online. voters are now duo owe votes rather are now due friday. the nominees will still be announced thursday january 10th. >> the queen of pop. is that her title now? madonna proves once again why she has earned that title. grossed nearly $30 million in tour revenue during 2012. unbelievable. also top on the polls are bruce spring teen. roger waters claims third and cold play taking 4th. rounding out the list lady gaga. the new madonna. >> i didn't realize madonna was still relevant. >> still ahead, this morning paul reed smith joins us live in studio to talk about his craft. plus he's going to play music for us. we'll tell you why he's in town also. >> first, get fit in 2013. up next we're going to dance. i'm heading over to studio b to learn aerobics to stay healthy in the new year. new year. share everything. share brotherly love. share one up's. mom ? mom ? the shar
is expected to cost up to $10 million. it will be built on state owned land behind the science museum of virginia. >>> coming up, we are going to hear how the redskins players are reacting. the big win against the cowboys. >>> and later this hour we'll take you inside the preparations for some of the big new year's eve parties in our area. >>> and big news about the health of president george h.w. bush. keep it here. yoceebatailein niorteuhesal yo cavg anmas u ssrrab. quitnciree aim buthacicevs se od cacae idroon henal ar twe dn, ndoc'tro yo emeba. myenstecmee tht us pnel bau ihes senhe thenme a ielveits i aoo j. because a chicken is what it eats. [ jim ] this seal verifies we feed my fresh all-natural chickens an all-vegetarian diet including corn, soybeans, and marigolds. no animal by-products. no meat and bone meal. when you put my chicken on the table, you know where it came from. that i put on my children's plate. that's why we use all-white meat, breading that is whole grain with omega-3 and no preservatives. it is my goal to make the highest quality, best-tasting nugget on th
at the science of it all. >>> this is fox 5 news at 5:00. >> second of state hillary teclinton is spending had you -o is spending her new year's evey in the hospital.ta this after doctors found a bloo clot in her head.her >> reporter: hillary clinton ist the hospital after the discovery of a blood clot on sunday. doctors found the clot during a follow up exam for a concussion she sustained earlier thiss month. secretary clinton is underun observation at new york presbyterian hospital through hs tuesday where she is being treated with blood thinners. the state department releasing a statement, saying her doctors will continue to assess her condition, including otherng issues associated with a cona customer. they will determine if any further action is required. medical experts say the seriousness of a blood clot depends on where it is. >> with the previous head trauma, may make her at risk for developing a bleed in her head. because they are thinning out her blood. it is classic and a very smart move to bring her into the hospital and observe her carefully. >> reporter: the top u.s. t diplomate
york presbyterian nbc's chief science and health correspondent robert bazell. what do we know this morning, bob? >> reporter: well, chris, since we've been talking about this last night we don't have a lot of information. we just have this one statement from secretary clinton's office and the hospital is not saying anything. a lot of doctors are telling me the information in that statement is a bit contradictory. here's why. they say that she has a blood clot that stemmed from a concussion she got several weeks ago. but the problem is, blood clots that stem from concussions don't usually get treated with blood thinning drugs which is what they say they're doing here. either she has a concussion someplace else that may not -- excuse me -- a blood clot someplace else that may not be related to the concussion or there is more to her health that we don't know about. they say they're watching her closely for a couple days. we will have to continue to watch ourselves to see what the situation is but right now all we know is that she is in this hospital. she's under observation. we d
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
in debates in school and college, they are often rather more about style than sub science. sometimes they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for improving
, no matter how wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> getting close to the bottom of the hour, we want to get you a look at the headlines right now. hillary clinton has been hospitalized. this after doctors discovered a blood clot. the former first lady had been cleared to go back to work when doctors made the discovery. she suffered icon cushion after fainting a couple weeks ago. she had a nasty stomach virus and collapsed from dehydration. we have a live report coming up in a couple minutes. >>> the other big story is the action or inaction on capitol hill. lawmakers do not reach a fiscal cliff agreement, could you see your taxes skyrocket and deep spending cuts kick in. major spending cuts entitlements and tax increases. house republicans have ended their meetings for the night. we'll find out tomorrow whether they've made any progress in their talks. any deal would have to get enough votes to pass the senate and the house. president obama says sandy hook school shooting was the worst day o
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